Archive for the ‘presentation’ Category

Focus

Push past emotional blocks

How many times have you sat down to write a marketing piece and stared at a blank sheet of paper desperately searching for a flash of inspiration?  Suddenly you have an overwhelming urge to make a cup of coffee.  The corner of a note on your desk catches your eye and you remember a promise to phone someone.  Three or four interruptions later you are still staring at a blank sheet of paper; you are now out of time to write.

 

David Foster, known as the Hit Man for all of his hit records, said in his Success Magazine cover story that sometimes he does not feel like writing a song.  He does it anyway.  Maybe it will be good rather than great, but it will be a song.  He went on to say that he forces himself to sit down and start writing; the inspiration will come.

 

Professional writers have spoken about writing a ten page paper and throwing away the first two pages before they hit their stride.

 

The Nike slogan says it best, “Just do it.”

 

How?

 

You can reach for the ultimate comfort food – warm chocolate brownies.  Or you can stop giving yourself excuses and start working.

 

Easier to tell yourself to concentrate than to do it?  

 

Probably true, but also realistic.  Amazing how many excuses and distractions you can create when you do not want to do something, do not know how to do it, or are simply not motivated to do it.   

 

  1. 1.       Set a timer for thirty minutes and tell yourself that you will focus until the buzzer rings.  Once you actually start writing, it usually starts to flow.

 

  1. 2.      Give yourself a reward when the project is completed. 

 

  1. 3.      Ask yourself a critical question.  What do you want the audience to think, feel or do after reading the material?  Answering that question can provide inspiration.

 

  1. Who is your target audience?  Until you know the individual you are expecting to read your material, you do not know how to write in the manner in which they will want to receive the message.  Think about your target client and write as if you are speaking to them.

 

  1. 5.      What problem would you like to solve for them?  In the case of the focus issue, the problem is writers block; the goal is to get the writer “un-stuck.”

 

What would you tell one of your clients, one of your employees, or one of your children if they were hitting a blank wall on an assignment?  Would you subscribe to the “Take my advice, I’m not using it” theory?  You probably would not admit it to them.  I’ve hit the wall many times with projects.  These are the ways I solve the inertia problem.

 

Take my own advice

 

What do I want you, my reader, to think?  Think that you are not alone.  Every business person faces the dilemma of “blank page syndrome” from time to time.

 

What is the goal for you to feel?  Feel that a solution exists.  Think of the block as tissue paper rather than stone and know that you can push through to success.

 

What should you do?  Follow the Nike slogan and “Just do it.”

For more information on overcoming emotional blocks, stay tuned to www.Elaine4Success.com.  Also inquire about hiring Elaine Love for your next sales training, executive meeting or personal growth presentation coaching.  Go to www.Elaine4Success.com/Contact or www.MeetElaineLove.com

Words Linger

Words create memories – good or bad

How important are the words you put in print?  We hear about blogging, social media comments and even writing marketing copy.  Your written words are actually more important than your spoken words.

 

Spoken words may be forgotten, but the written word is permanent.  Once you hit “send” or “submit,” those words are available to be found forever.

 

Private?  Think again.

 

That funny party picture you posted as a joke is available also.  I hear some of you saying, “no, I posted in my private setting.  That posting will never be public.”  Wrong.  Regardless of the privacy setting, if someone wants to find it badly enough, they will.  If even one person re-tweets or copies the picture or text, it is now public.

 

True story

 

A young woman was so proud of her body building contest results that she posted the picture on her Facebook page.  If you know anything about those contests, you know that the attire makes a string bikini look prudish. What seems like harmless fun in her 20s may come back to haunt her.  Would you want a “nearly nude” picture of yourself on the internet for your parents, children and your boss to see?

 

Words come back to bite you

 

Be conscious of the words you write.  You are representing yourself and your company with each comment.  This is the age of the spontaneous comment.  It only takes a second to hit “send” but the results remain

 

Am I trying to scare you into not posting on the internet?  Absolutely not.  I’m posting this right now.

 

Another true story

 

Two individuals in an organization chose to escalate their disagreement into a public display.  Feelings were hurt, words were written which in retrospect should never have been said.  The repercussions are still being felt throughout the organization seven months later.  A disagreement which could have been solved quietly has mushroomed into a major disruption.  The entire organization is suffering.

 

Once written words become public, they may be retracted, but they are not removed from memories.

 

Words linger

 

.Why is writing important in your organization?  Your marketing copy is obviously public.  It represents your company.  The image you project in your marketing materials must be positive, but it must also be honest.

 

There is a common expression throughout network marketing and other media to “fake it until you make it.”   The catchphrase was originally designed to create a feeling of success; by acting “as If” you have already achieved the desired level of success, you will trick your sub conscious into making that your reality.  The problem is that when that statement goes public, others do not know whether it is an internal statement or the truth.  97% of people fail in network marketing.  Perhaps some entered the business with a false sense of probability.

 

Be aware of the consequences of your spoken words and your written words not only on yourself but also on others.

 

For more keys to a successful spoken or written presentation, contact Elaine Love at Elaine@Elaine4Success.com or www.Elaine4Success.com.  If you want to take your communication from Now to WOW, implement this simple key.  Want more keys to success for yourself and your company?  Hire Elaine Love as your coach, corporate trainer or keynote speaker.

 

Reflections and Realizations 2012-2013

 

Commit to making 2013 even better than 2012

Looking back over 2012, what were your highlights?  Being a glass half full and optimistic person, I prefer to focus on the positives.  Yes, I learn from the negatives as well as the positives.  Since it is a known fact that we always receive more of whatever we give our time, energy and focus, I prefer to concentrate on the positive.

 

What were the personal highlights of 2012?  What did you learn about yourself?

2012 was an eventful year for me.  My first book, Emotional Ice Water was published.  The comments about how much it helped people to get out of their own way and start truly living life to the fullest warmed my heart.  One man very close to me said, “It was better than I thought it would be; that could be a compliment.  I’ve decided to take it as a left-handed compliment.

 

Even though it was an entire year ahead of schedule, I became President of the Castle Pines Rotary club in July.  With the unexpected turmoil which caused my early ascension, it has been a bumpy road but we are making progress.  I jumped in with both feet up to the top of the curls and relate 100% to the values and mission of Rotary.

 

A few unexpected financial events have made a wonderful and truly appreciated upswing in income toward the end of 2012.  That is never a bad turn of events.  Nice way to end the year.

 

 Which relationships meant the most to you in 2012?

Once again, the deepening friendships with Rotarians have astounded and pleased me.

In fact, the genuine outpouring of caring from friends and my sons has truly been heartwarming.  I can’t say enough loving words about my sons.  Wow, am I fortunate.  I’ve laughed that I’m not certain if the fine men they have become is because of me or in spite of me, but I’m grateful nonetheless.

 

What was one of the biggest challenges you faced this year and how did you handle it?

For me as for many Americans, the challenge was endeavoring to keep the income above the outgo.  There are conflicting points of view as to whether the economy is getting better or if the Band-Aid on America’s debt will pull loose revealing a deep gash.

 

 What did you do for fun in 2012?  What was one of your fondest memories?

One of the highlights of my year is always related to my grandsons.  Those adorable little guys have Gamma wrapped securely around their little hands.  For instance at 5 am on Christmas morning both little guys pounce on the bed and say, “Up Gamma, you’re missing Christmas.”  Sleepy-eyed but smiling, we all head upstairs to the Christmas tree.

 

Even though the questions and answers could continue, the importance is reflecting on 2012 in a positive way and seeking the wisdom to commit to making 2013 even better than 2012.  Not just commit, but follow through.

 

When we build positives on positives, the world becomes a happier and more fulfilling place.

Story Telling Tips and Techniques

  1. Keep a success journal for your personal successes and another for your career successes.  Make 3 to 5

    World Class Speaking Coach

    entries every day in each journal.  Each success is a story.

Carry a small pocket recorder to jot story idea notes.  Use the notes section on your smart phone.

 

  1. I keep a note pad in my exercise area and another on my night stand to jot fast notes.  Trying to recall an idea hours later is seldom productive.

 

  1. Create a story file; you can make a file on your desktop or on paper.  No need to write out the entire story, bullet points will be fine.

 

  1. Every story should have:

Characters

Conflict

Cure – solution

Change – change in the behavior or attitude of a character

Carry Out Message

 

  1. Jot notes throughout your day of situations which make a point about helping someone or solving a problem.  These stories will help you be ready during interviews, meeting prospective clients and in social interactions.

 

  1. Hints for advanced story telling:

Tell stories in dialog rather than monologue

Incorporate 5 senses

Make someone else the hero

Head, Heart, Humor and Helpful walk away message

Then, Now and How

 

  1. Stories help you connect with your audience, not just communicate.  You only have to connect with your audience if you want them to remember you and remember what you said.

 

         Elaine Love
World Class Speech Coach
www.Elaine4Success.com
Elaine@Elaine4Success.com

        303-284-0514

Connection – The Object of Conversation

Conversations with friends

Connection, not just conversation is Key

Conversations should flow naturally and smoothly.  Relax and be yourself.  The more you are fully engaged and genuinely interested in both the topic and the person to whom you are speaking, the more comfortable it will be for both parties.

 

Key – It is called conversation, not monologue.  Both parties should be participating.

 

How to start a conversation

 

Every conversation is an opportunity for connection.  The people in front of you may or may not be your ideal client, but they may know the perfect client for you.  We are all connected to everyone else by six degrees of separation.  (“Six degrees of separation is the idea that everyone is on average approximately six steps away, by way of introduction, from any other person in the world, so that a chain of “a friend of a friend” statements can be made, on average, to connect any two people in six steps. It was originally set out by Frigyes Karinthy and popularized by a play written by John Guare.”)

 

Questions

 

Questions are excellent conversation starters.  Allison Graham’s article “Hate Small Talk” said, Mastering small talk will help you find common ground to create a mini-bond with new contacts. Small talk may feel trite and unimportant, but it’s the small talk that leads to the big talk.”

 

What questions can you ask which will stimulate conversation and connection?

 

  • What brought you to this event?
  • When you’re not working or networking, what do you enjoy doing?
  • How did you happen to start in your line of work?
  • What organizations do you belong to?  (social, professional, service)
  • What are your vacation plans for this year?  (or holiday plans)
  • Name something positive which happened to you lately.

 

If the conversation lags but you really do not want to end it, be creative.  You know what interests you; keep moving from topic to topic until you find what interests them. Establishing common interests creates connection.

 

Appreciation

 

Comment on an attractive shirt or tie for a man or a blouse or shoes for a woman.  Be genuine.  Men like to be complimented on their attire as much as women do.

 

Mentioning a special award or accomplishment they or a member of their family has recently received is always a positive.  If you can take a photo of them receiving the award or a clipping from the paper and enclose it in your personalized printed note card, it makes a memorable gift.  Your thoughtfulness creates an emotional connection.

 

One of my clients gave me a gift of notepads with my company logo on them as a Thank You gift.  PrintPlace creates custom printed notepads.  These pads become a constant reminder of the appreciation of the giver and a reminder of the high quality of the printer.

You only have to connect emotionally if you want them to remember you.  People remember how you make them feel more than they remember your words.  Note cards create emotional connections; thoughtful notes are excellent follow up reminders of your conversation.

 

What Not to Say

 

Avoid Foot in Mouth Syndrome

 

Intense discussions about work, politics, religion or sensitive social issues are taboo – totally unacceptable.

 

Don’t always have to be right.  I once dated a man who said he was “often wrong but never in doubt.”  Even if you know you are right, this may not be the time to push the issue.  You will not win points.

 

When is it Time to Move On to the Next Person?

 

Body Language

 

Shifting feet, glances around the room and disengaged behavior in the conversation all say “It’s time to move on.  This conversation is over at this time.”

 

Smooth Transitions

 

If you are the one who desires to move on, offer to introduce them to “Ms or Mr X.”  It is a smooth transition and will most likely be viewed as helping them.

 

If you have made a solid connection, ask when they would like to get together for a cup of coffee and continue the conversation.  This is the perfect time to offer your business card.  Pull out your smart phone and coordinate calendars for your follow up meeting.  Make a note of the follow up time, date and a conversation note on their business card.  Ideally, they will make a similar note on your business card.

 

Be conscious of focusing genuine attention on them.  Ask engaging questions, make eye contact, give a firm but not crushing handshake, confirm common values and interests, listen and be appreciative.  Remain aware of body language both positive and negative.  Connect emotionally.  Make a smooth transition out of the conversation just as you made a smooth transition into the conversation.

 

 

 

 

The Connection Objective of Networking

“People buy more from those they know, like and trust” has been stated repeatedly through the decades even though the originator of the quote is unknown.  How do people get to know, like and trust you?  One of the fastest ways is through networking.  Personal face-to-face contact allows the listener to hear the words, tone of voice and observe the body language.

 

Why take the time to network?

 

Networking requires time, energy and genuine attentiveness.  If you think you can’t spare the time to network, consider that you will receive more value for your soft-money investment than you would by spending the equivalent amount in actual hard-money dollars.

Benefits of networking                                                                 

Connections are key to Networking

Connect emotionally

  • Increased sales
  • Larger transaction amount per sale
  • Higher closing ratio
  • More repeat and referral business
  • Community awareness
  • Greater perceived trust

“The more solid relationships you build, the more credible you are. The more your credibility grows, the more people will hire and recommend you.”  Can you afford NOT to network?

Websites, pop-up ads, online banners and pay-per-click ads all tout the benefits of your business.  Once you make face to face contact, you become a personality.  You have the opportunity to form a connection.  Now your business card has a face and a voice attached.

Your brochure becomes an extension of you, the person, not just any business.  Dan Kennedy attended a trade show with the specific intention of purchasing a generator.  He visited several booths and received their brochures.  Kennedy said, “If you took the name off the top of the brochure, the features listed were interchangeable.”  Your business has competition.  Without the personal contact, your business may blend into the masses.  When you make a personal connection with a person and hand them your brochure, your personality intensifies the value of your business.  Online does not have the personal touch of a smile and a handshake.

With networking you increase the value of all of your marketing, but especially the printed marketing materials you hand a prospect during your conversation.

Disadvantages of networking

  • It takes time to drive to and from events
  • To be effective, personal contact requires you to listen
  • Some expense is involved – transportation costs and beverage costs at the event

How to Network Effectively

Create a plan

  1. Go alone.  You will talk to more people.
  2. Make a list of specific individuals you would like to contact and pertinent details to be discussed.  Refresh the list after each event adding new names and recording the results of the contacts accomplished.
  3. Set an objective for the event.  Are you seeking investors, education, inspiration, connections or clients?
  4. Ask insightful questions. Attentively listen to people and demonstrate that you care about what they are saying by asking them to expand on their points of wisdom.
  5. Add value by introducing them to others who would be important connections for them.
  6. Make a note on their business card to remind you of the conversation and the person.  (Consider making the front of your card high gloss for visual appeal and the back of the card in a finish which permits writing notes.)
  7. Relax.  You are attending to make connections not bowl people over with a sales pitch.  Networking is not to close the sale but to make the connection for a future appointment.
  8. Speak casually at a slower pace and lower tone.  You are not there to collect a handful of cards, but to have genuine conversations.
  9. Be brief.  People love to talk about themselves.  You are there to learn more about them.  Interestingly enough, they will be more impressed by your genuine listening and attention to them than if you spouted volumes of information about yourself.
  10. Follow up after the event.  Send an email, make a telephone call, and send a handwritten note on your personalized business notecard stationery.
  11. Understand the tremendous value of networking.  The critical keys to effective networking are to go with a focused mindset and plan to be conscious of making genuine connections.  Be attentive and engage in genuine conversations.  Demonstrate your intention of helping others.  Make notes, future appointments and follow up.  People do business with those they know, like and trust.  Increase your connections with networking.

Understand the tremendous value of networking.  The critical keys to effective networking are to go with a focused mindset and plan to be conscious of making genuine connections.  Be attentive and engage in genuine conversations.  Demonstrate your intention of helping others.  Make notes, future appointments and follow up.  People do business with those they know, like and trust.  Increase your connections with networking.

Competitive Advantage or Perish

Product benefit list

Your competitive advantage is your quality, value, delivery or service.

Marketing is designed to present your competitive advantage to your target client.  When you know what problem your product or service solves, your research begins.  The next step is to determine who has that specific problem and how can you reach them.

Do you have an excellent product or service?  Why isn’t the world beating down the doors to purchase from you?  The answer may be your competitive advantage.  What is a competitive advantage?

There have always been a plethora of companies who offer similar products and services.  How many brands of toilet tissue, orange juice or automobile tires are in the marketplace?  If you are in a niche market all alone, fabulous; however with the access to the internet, your competition could be anywhere in the world.  Ideally you will develop some positive variation of the business which would make customers choose your product instead of your competitors offering.  How do you do that? You create a competitive advantage.  Your competitive advantage may be changing the quality, value or delivery.  Your advantage could be your customer service, your speedy delivery, or even the convenience of purchasing.  If price becomes your only advantage, beware.  One price war with a large company and you could be devastated.

BI (before the internet), the majority of your competition resided within less than 100 miles of you.  Now you either compete on a massive scale or pack up and head home. At one time speech coaching was a face to face customer basis.  With the arrival of Skype and web cameras, your speech coaching client could be in France.

Your advantage should change the behavior of the customer.  Entice them to want to come to you and do business with you.  How do you do that?  Offer a benefit to them.  Spend some time speaking with them and discover the problem they would pay to have solved.  Once you know their pain, you know exactly what product or service to offer from your product line which will solve their problem.  They can’t and won’t purchase from you until they know what you have to offer.  Job number one for a company is to be certain their target market knows what they have to offer.

How can you extend your reach to “touch” more customers?  Enlist your employees in the process.  It is in their best interest for you to be successful.  Pay checks do not continue to flow out from unsuccessful companies.  Offer unique incentives to employees to assist in promoting the company.  Supply them with the latest marketing promotional materials; keep them informed and “in the loop.”

Once the customer knows you have the solution, it is a matter of selecting the ideal solution from your product arsenal to solve their problem.

Your competitive advantage must do something positive for the product or the customer.  Be specific about the benefits of your product.  Carefully avoid listing features; describe benefits.  A lady sat at my kitchen table recently attempting to sell me her line of skin care.  She recited a long list of ingredients.  Ingredients are features.  If she had said, “Elaine, use this face cream and it will reduce your wrinkles by 30% in 10 days.”  If she had given me that benefit, I would have purchased on the spot.  People buy on benefits, not features.

It is not truly a competitive advantage until your employees or customers take action.  Children react on rewards or penalties.  Employees and customers follow the same pattern of reacting to consequences.

Conduct interviews with current customers, past customers and potential customers.

What do they like?

What do the not like?

What would they like to have but do not have at this time?

What would they pay to have which they do not have right now?  You may be asking yourself what is the difference in the last two questions.  The difference is a “nice to have” which they may or may not be willing to purchase at this time or a “need to have” which they will absolutely pay for right away.

Competitive advantages are improvements in quality, value, delivery or service.  What is your competitive advantage?  If you don’t know, start creating one.

For more information on competitive advantages, stay tuned to www.Elaine4Success.com.  Also inquire about hiring Elaine Love for your next sales training, executive meeting or personal growth presentation coaching.  Go to www.Elaine4Success.com/Contact or www.MeetElaineLove.com.

Empathy or . . .

Do you have empathy or sympathy?  Your mind may be questioning why this is important or what it has to

Be approahable

People do more for those they know, like and trust.

do with business.  Why do you need either one in your career?

Sympathy is feeling for someone.  You might sympathize with a co-worker who has the flu or even a more serious illness.  You could sympathize with someone who experienced a traumatic car accident.  You feel for the person but you cannot totally relate to exactly how that other person may feel.  You have sympathy but not empathy.

Empathy is feeling with the person.  If you have personally experienced a major illness or suffered a serious automobile accident, you may be able to feel with the person.  You know more about how they may be feeling because you experienced a similar situation.  Empathy is feeling with the person.

What does this have to do with business?  Placing yourself in the mindset of your customer will help you know what they may need in a given situation.

When the economy took a sharp nosedive in 2008, retirement portfolios were adversely affected for far too many people.  If you were one of those whose 401 K became a 41K, you can certainly empathize.

Doing your best to put yourself in your prospect’s situation or your employee’s situation can ease the tension.  People always do more for those they know, like and trust.  It is so much easier to know, like and trust someone you feel understands you and cares about you.

That does not mean a mutual pity party; it means you both relate to the situation so you can search for mutual positive solutions.  You can empathize with each other and help each other pull up and out of a tough situation.  “Thanks for understanding” builds much more goodwill and positive energy than “You don’t know what it’s like.  You have no idea what it feels like to be in my situation.”  Heavy doses of sympathy will not bridge that gap.  Only empathy will truly ease the chasm between you.

Strive to empathize not sympathize and your relationships will significantly improve.

If you desire to improve your life, build your personal and professional relationships.

For more information on relationships, stay tuned to www.Elaine4Success.com.  Also inquire about hiring Elaine Love for your next sales training, executive meeting or personal growth presentation coaching.  Go to www.Elaine4Success.com/Contact or www.MeetElaineLove.com.

Relationship Thermometer

If your relationships were on a thermometer, would they register “warm and happy” or “cold and distant?”

Improving relationships and peace

Key to better relationships

The recent issue of Success magazine cd featured an interview depicting our relationships primarily as either a victim or a competitor role.  It went on to say that many of our communication issues and thus communication problems stem from both parties choosing to occupy the victim role at the same time.  “You did this to me.”  “No, I am the one who is wronged.  You need to apologize.”  If both parties are locked into a “I’m right and you are wrong” mindset, how can we possibly resolve conflicts?

It was once said that all wars would end in lightning speed if the politicians who were pontificating were squared off on the front line against each other with live weapons instead of sending our innocent young soldiers to the front lines.  The danger of live bullets instead of sharp words could make a significant difference in the willingness to listen, understand the opposing view and reach a resolution.

This same willingness to listen, care about the feelings and opinions of the other party, and find a mutually agreeable solution could solve innumerable personal and professional misunderstandings as well.

Where are your relationships on the temperature scale?  Are you locked into your position with a closed mind or are you attentively listening to the opposing view with an attempt to understand.

What good could possibly come from stepping out of the “I’m right.  You’re wrong” or “I’m the victim” role and listening with genuine interest and curiosity to the other person?  Fewer unhappy marriages?  Fewer lawsuits? Fewer business conflicts?  Perhaps we would even have more happy, productive employees.  What a concept – healing relationships rather than intensifying conflict.

Unless you enjoy being miserable or making others unhappy, it is certainly a valid thought.  Just for the exercise today, even if it is only for an hour, resolve to listen and understand rather than lash out.  You may be delighted with the outcome.

Raise your relationship temperature into the warm and happy zone on the thermometer.  Listen and attempt to understand the other party   You may actually end the day with a smile instead of a frown and know that you did the same for the other party.

For more information on relationships, stay tuned to www.Elaine4Success.com.  Also inquire about hiring Elaine Love for your next sales training, executive meeting or personal growth presentation coaching.  Go to www.Elaine4Success.com/Contact or www.MeetElaineLove.com

Relationships

Elaine Love, author of Emotional Ice Water

If you are ready to get out of your own way, you owe it to yourself to read this book

In the book Emotional Ice Water, the tag line reminds us that it is not about what others say and do but what we think, feel and do.  These words of wisdom relate to all aspects of our relationships.  Yes, your reputation may revolve around the opinions of others, but our self-image and our self-esteem must be solidly rooted in a healthy self-confidence and belief in our self-worth.

If we do not believe in ourselves and the value we bring to our relationships, how can we possibly expect others to believe in us?

Picture a salesman walking in to a meeting where his job requires him to effectively present his product.  If he does not believe in himself or his product, it would take a small miracle for him to be able to present with confidence and conviction.  Image the salesman’s inner dialogue.  If he is saying, “This product is far too expensive for their budget.” Or perhaps his or her thoughts are “I wish I had my sales manager here to demonstrate this product.  They do a much better job of describing the features and benefits than I do.”  These self-doubts and lack of confidence in the potential positive outcome of the presentation absolutely transmit to the customer.  Consciously or unconsciously, the doubts manifest; even a semi-aware customer picks up on the negative vibration.

It took me eight months to make my first sale in a high end network marketing company.  Was it the product?  No.  Was it the fault of the company?  No.  Perhaps the blame rests at the feet of my enroller (upline).  No.  The problem centered solidly on my shoulders.  At that point, I did not have confidence in myself and my sales ability.  I was not building a relationship with the prospect.  My lack of confidence in my abilities provided more of a hesitation than an incentive to purchase.

After serious study and personal development, eventually the sales flowed in abundance.  At one point, the results were over $57,000 per month.  What made the difference?  The difference maker was learning to build relationships.

So are your minds asking, “How do I build relationships?  Tell me, I want that level of income.”

Relationships are built by focusing on the prospect.  What do they need?  What is important to them?  How will the product or service benefit them?

When the attention is focused on the benefit to the other party rather than on an attitude of “What is in this for me,” the relationship builds.  When the relationship solidifies, the resistance lowers.

Relationship building is essential in every aspect of life.  Personal relationships deepen when you care more about the other person than you do about yourself.  Do you enjoy having the people you care about demonstrate that they care about you?  Of course you do.

Business relationships work the same way.  Do you enjoy being sold, pressured or manipulated to buy?  No.  People always buy more from those they know, like and trust.  A trusting relationship encourages more interaction.  The tendency is frequently to run from those we do not like or trust.

 

If you desire to improve your life, build your personal and professional relationships.

For more information on relationships, stay tuned to www.Elaine4Success.com.  Also inquire about hiring Elaine Love for your next sales training, executive meeting or personal growth presentation coaching.  Go to www.Elaine4Success.com/Contact or www.MeetElaineLove.com

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”Elaine spoke to our top leaders from 8 states, she gave us new and positive ways to connect with people
which is EXACTLY what we wanted. Thanks Elaine”
-Tom Fajardo, State Farm